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Three Misconceptions about StudentTracker for High Schools

Education Leaders Discuss What Colleges and High Schools Can Learn from Each Other at 2019 NASSP National Principals Conference

by NSC BlogJul 30, 2019K-12, Research Services, StudentTracker for High Schools

Executives from the National Student Clearinghouse joined nearly 3,000 principals and assistant principals from across the country at the 2019 NASSP National Principals Conference in Boston from July 18-20.

Rick Torres, President and CEO of the Clearinghouse, led a panel discussion titled, “Bridging the Educational Divide: What Colleges and High Schools Can Learn from Each Other,” with education leaders on the joint challenges facing secondary and postsecondary education in 21st century America.

The panelists addressed three key challenges and opportunities for principals and administrators:

  1. How success is viewed holistically across the nation;
  2. The difficulties to read data for actionable results; and
  3. Engagement with data and effectively using the information.

“At the Clearinghouse we continuously are looking to understand how StudentTracker for High Schools’ data can be better utilized by K-12 administrators to answer access and outcome questions starting with ‘what’s happening, why is it happening and what interventions can be implemented?’ said Clearinghouse President Torres. “StudentTracker is a unique national program designed to help high schools and school districts and professionals on the front lines more accurately gauge the college access and success of their graduates.”

Gil Compton with the Riverside County Office of Education in Riverside, California replied, “As a county officer, it is about taking the data and using it for interventions. This can’t be a bolt on matter but integral to processes and the bigger picture. If we are going to increase college access, we need to diagnose our systems to be effective.

“The more aligned leaders and staff are, then the more powerful the data becomes. It’s about leadership, knowing the value of the data, understanding the data, and sharing the results and the impact so others leverage the data and results.”

Shannon Coulter, Lead Evaluation Coordinator for the San Diego County Office of Education, said there are 51 high schools in the county using the Clearinghouse’s StudentTracker for High Schools’ service to obtain accurate data about students attending and completing college.

“In our county, there’s great variability of school environments from large to small rural schools,” Coulter said. “Many schools are using StudentTracker, but we need to share best practices and training around the data to be effective. We need to help students make better decisions about college.”

Jayne Ellspermann, the 2015 NASSP National Principal of the Year and former NASSP President from 2016-2017, “StudentTracker data helps students see that they are qualified and prepared to go to college,” Ellspermann said. “Work is needed at the school level to help families see the opportunities, and leverage data to inform students and guidance counselors. The data helps us to be responsible administrators and adjust to help students be successful.”

Watch for more information about this impactful panel discussion and our work with the National Association of Secondary School Principals to benefit high schools!

2019 NASSP Panel

Clearinghouse Product Manager John Schiappa introduced the panelists (left to right) Rick Torres, Jayne Ellspermann, Shannon Coulter and Gil Compton who discussed the joint challenges facing secondary and postsecondary education in 21st century America.

“StudentTracker is a unique national program designed to help high schools and school districts and professionals on the front lines more accurately gauge the college access and success of their graduates.”

Rick Torres
President and CEO, National Student Clearinghouse

 

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