Home » Clearinghouse Today Blog » Mobility Rate Holding Steady at 9.4 Percent Across All Higher Ed Sectors
Mobility Rate Holding Steady at 9.4 Percent Across All Higher Ed Sectors

Mobility Rate Holding Steady at 9.4 Percent Across All Higher Ed Sectors

by NSC Blog | May 2, 2016 | Research Services, Snapshot Reports |

The National Student Clearinghouse® Research Center™ recently released the Postsecondary Student One-Year Mobility Snapshot Report for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Snapshot Report indicates that 9.4 percent of all students enrolled in more than one institution within 2014-15.

“While traditional student transfers occur between academic years, this report shows that students frequently move among institutions even within a single year,” stated Dr. Doug Shapiro, Executive Research Director of the Research Center. “In order for states and institutions to better support today’s non-traditional students, they need a better understanding of the types of transitions that students navigate, not just over the long term, but every single year.”

The postsecondary student one-year mobility rate is the percentage of students, across all levels of study, who enrolled in more than one institution within a single academic year, including summer and concurrent enrollments.

Snapshot 21 Figure 1

 

In each year, nearly 75 percent of all mobile students had at least one enrollment at a two-year public institution. Of all students who attended multiple institutions in 2014-15, over 40 percent moved between two-year public institutions and four-year public institutions, in either direction.

In 2014-15, the share of mobility accounted for by student churn among two-year public institutions diminished slightly from 18.4 percent to 17.5 percent.

Snapshot 21 Figure 2

“While traditional student transfers occur between academic years, this report shows that students frequently move among institutions even within a single year.”

Dr. Doug Shapiro
Executive Research Director of the Research Center

Share this article...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
LinkedIn
RSS